Moscow City Symphony
Russian Philharmonic

Great Russia

Great Russia
Date and time: 
Wednesday, November 5, 2014 - 18:00
Venue: 
Moscow International House of Music. Svetlanov Hall
Program: 
M. Mussorgsky. Dawn on the Moskva River
P. Tchaikovsky. Concerto № 1 for piano and orchestra
S. Prokofiev. Oratorio Ivan the Terrible
Conductor: 
Alexander Vakoulsky
Soloist: 
Alexander Ghindin, piano
V. Popov Chorus Art Academy

One of the most famous and popular concertos for piano and orchestra – Concerto № 1 by Tchaikovsky will be performed by Honoured Artist of Russia Alexander Ghindin. He graduated from the Moscow Conservatory and post graduate course in the class of professor, People’s Artist of Russia Mikhail Voskresensky. At the age of 17 the musician became a Prize-winner of the X International Tchaikovsky Competition, in 1999 he received the Second prize of the Queen Elizabeth Music Competition in Brussels. In 2007 he won the Cleveland International Piano Competition (USA). The musician performs at major concert halls: Averifiher Hall (New York), Kennedy Center (Washington), Suntory Hall, Sumida Triphony Hall (Japan), Palais dex Beaux-Arts (Brussels), “Concertgebough” (Amsterdam), Salle Gaveau, Theatre de Champs Elysees, Theatre du Chatelet (Paris), Gasteig (Munich), Rudolfium (Prague), Ricksallen (Stockholm), Theatre Olimpica (Rome),Opera House (Tel Aviv), at the halls of Warsaw, Saint Petersburg, and Moscow Philharmonic Societies.

Ivan the Terrible is one of the pinnacles of Sergey Prokofiev’s creative work and his last joint project with prominent film director Sergei Eisenstein. Making of this music started in 1942. Longstanding collaboration of the composer and film director turned out to be very successful. The score was created amid an upsurge in patriotism throughout the country. Prokofiev’s film music went far beyond the limits of merely background music. Ivan the Terrible oratorio calls for reader, choir, and orchestra. However, it wasn’t Prokofiev who wrote this piece of work. Prokofiev left film music – a set of separate pieces that don’t make up a whole. Besides, the pieces composed by Prokofiev in the film go together with arrangements and excerpts from other kinds of music (mostly liturgical). It wasn’t until 1961, after Prokofiev died, that Abram Stasevich created oratorio Ivan the Terrible. Stasevich added on the reader’s part that constitutes the drama core bringing together numerous varying pieces of the oratorio. The first performance celebrated Prokofiev’s 70th birthday.

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