Moscow City Symphony
Russian Philharmonic

Holiday of Music

Boris Berezovsky
Date and time: 
Monday, September 29, 2014 - 18:00
Venue: 
Moscow International House of Music. Svetlanov Hall
Program: 
G. Gershwin. An American in Paris
G. Gershwin. Rhapsody in Blue
I. Raykhelson. Concerto for piano and orchestra (Premiere in Russia)
T. Shakhidi. Symphonic poem «Sado»
Conductor: 
Hobart Earle (USA)
Soloist: 
Boris Berezovsky, piano

Moscow City Symphony – Russian Philharmonic opens its 15th season with Russian premiere of concerto for piano and orchestra by Igor Raykhelson. It will be performed by remarkable representative of world piano elite – Boris Berezovsky, to whom the composer has dedicated this work. I. Raykhelson is called one of the leading contemporary composers – neo-romanticists. His melodius, expressive music is popular all over the world. Combination of his beloved jazz and classical music is the base of I. Raykhelson’s creative work.

“Boris Berezovsky is a pianist of rare scenic fascination. Berezovsky’s play is distinguished by incredible technique, deep sound, amazing “facility”, and fantastically beautiful piano. Undoubtedly, we are having real Russian piano school successor” – here’s estimation by authoritative magazine Gramophone. Boris Berezovsky is one of the most sought-after pianists of the world. His art is distinguished by phenomenal virtuosity, perfect sound with richest dynamic nuances range, convincing interpretations of compositions of different epochs and styles.

Combination of Afro-American jazz and folk traditions, Broadway pop music with European classical music found full-blooded and natural incarnation, defining the main stylistic feature of George Gershwin’s music, particularly, in Rhapsody in Blue and An American in Paris. Jazz musical art made fundamental impact on the composer, who aimed to reflect the spirit of his epoch in his music.

Music by Tolibkhon Shakhidi is organic synthesis of two great cultures: East and West. Symphonic poem Sado is partly based on Tajik folklore traditions, but the composer turns to those archaic traditional music notes, which are originally polynational

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